species: Acropora intermedia in Lizard Island Field Guide (Lizard Island Field Guide)
Acropora intermedia


©Andy Lewis: Acropora intermedia at Watson's Bay, Lizard Island in Jul 2017. This colony survived the 2016 and 2017 bleaching events.

©Andy Lewis: Branch tip of Acropora intermedia showing the diagnostic features - radial corallites are in two sizes, with the larger ones relatively long, often downward curved at the tip and with a long dimidiate opening giving a rasp-like appearance. Fine brown lines on the coenosteum underneath the polyp are also typical.

©Anne Hoggett: Acropora intermedia at Clam Garden, Lizard Island.
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Cnidaria
Class Anthozoa
Order Scleractinia
Family Acroporidae
Genus Acropora
Species Acropora intermedia

Colours

                        

Distinguishing features

This species has a staghorn morphology, with long tapering branches and an open growth form (formerly known as A. nobilis).The axial polyp is small and lightly coloured, while radial corallites are usually in two sizes, with the larger ones relatively long, often downward curved at the tip and with a long dimidiate opening giving a rasp-like appearance. Fine brown lines on the coenosteum underneath the polyp are also typical. Colours include cream, brown, blue, yellow and green. (Contributed by Andy Lewis)

Size

  • Size data has not been obtained.

Synonyms

Similar taxa

  • Animalia: species: Acropora muricata
    has slightly smaller, more closely spaced radial corallites that tend to a tubular or slightly dimidiate opening, with many different sized corallites all mixed together. (Contributed by Andy Lewis)

Comments

Veron (2000) refers to this species as Acropora robusta, which is considered a synonym of Acropora robusta (WORMS accessed 21 Sep 2016).

by Anne Hoggett

Distribution


©Atlas of Living Australia: Australian distribution

Distribution and habitat preferences

Lagoons and back reef areas.

Abundant in shallow habitats around Lizard Island.

Behaviour

Like most Acroporidae, this species is a hermaphrodite broadcast spawner, releasing gametes shortly after dark in the few days after the full moon in the warmer months between November and February.

Web resources

References

References that assist with identification

  • Veron, J.E.N. (2000). Corals of the World: Volume 1 Australian Institute of Marine Science, Townsvile.

Other references

  • Alvarez-Noriega, M., A.H. Baird, M. Dornelas, J.S. Madin and S.R. Connolly (2018). Negligible effect of competition on coral colony growth. Ecology, 99 (6): 1347-1356. LIRS catalog number 2239.
  • Baird, A.H., J.R. Guest and B.L. Willis (2009). Systematic and biogeographical patterns in the reproductive biology of scleractinian corals, Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 40: 551-571.
  • View all references