Banded Blenny (species: Salarias fasciatus) in taxonomy (Lizard Island Field Guide)
Salarias fasciatus
Banded Blenny


©Anne Hoggett: Salarias fasciatus near rocky shore on North Point reef flat, Lizard Island. Thanks to Jeff Johnson and Chris Goatley for the identification through iNaturalist. Jeff noted (21 Jan 2021) "vertical bands not always clear, fine lines present on upper anterior body".

©Anne Hoggett: Salarias fasciatus near rocky shore on North Point reef flat, Lizard Island. Thanks to Jeff Johnson and Chris Goatley for the identification through iNaturalist. Jeff noted (21 Jan 2021) "vertical bands not always clear, fine lines present on upper anterior body".

©Anne Hoggett: Salarias fasciatus on the reef flat at North Point, Lizard Island.
Kingdom Animalia
Phylum Chordata
Class Actinopterygii
Order Perciformes
Family Blenniidae
Genus Salarias
Species Salarias fasciatus

Colours

         

Distinguishing features

A large blenny with a complex pattern of mottled grey spots and patches over the body, fine wavy lines on anterior upper body, sometimes darker bars anteriorly, and a sprinkling of small, sparse bright blue spots posteriorly. Found resting on the top of complex branching coral heads or hidden within dead coral branches.

Size

  • Up to 14 cm (Standard length)

Depth range

  • Depth range data is not yet available.

Synonyms

Similar taxa

Distribution


©Atlas of Living Australia: Australian distribution

Distribution and habitat preferences

Tops of lagoonal patch reefs in shallow water. Wilson (2001) found this species closely associated with dead branching corals at Lizard Island.

Found in most reef habitats around the island not exposed to heavy wave action.

Behaviour

The Banded Blenny is solitary and lives amongst dead branching corals on top of prominant coral platforms. They rest on the pectoral fins in between bouts of feeding. These fishes are mainly detritivores, combing small particles of organic material from the turf algae found inside the damselfish territories of Ward's Damsel and the Dusky Gregory, which typically farm algae on the tops of the bommies favoured by the blenny.

Web resources

References

  • Caley, M.J. (1995). Community dynamics of tropical reef fishes: local patterns between latitudes, Marine Ecology Progress Series, 129: 7-18. LIRS catalog number 447.
  • Caley, M.J. (1995). Reef fish community structure and dynamics: in interaction between local and larger-scale processes? Marine Ecology Progress Series, 129: 19-29. LIRS catalog number 448.
  • Caley, M.J. and J. St John (1996). Refuge availability structures assemblages of tropical reef fishes, Journal of Animal Ecology, 65: 414-428. LIRS catalog number 458.
  • View all references